THV: Love Thy Neighbor

Love Thy Neighbor is Tonight! Check out interview with Craig O’Neill.

Click here to watch interview.

Hope to see you there!

 

Love Thy Neighbor 2018 Together as One

Love Thy Neighbor 2018

 

Join us at 6 p.m. Thursday September 6 at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church for the 7th Annual Love Thy Neighbor Event! 

The service will last about an hour and includes speakers from different faiths, time for prayer and silence, musical performances from local artists, an interfaith children’s chorus, and a presentation by the Multifaith Youth Group.

Stick around after the program; we’ll feed you! The Interfaith Food Festival will feature vegetarian dishes and food from several faith communities.  Although no childcare will be provided, children are welcome at this event.

More information at lovethyneighbor2018.eventbrite.com.

Invite friends and share online.  Please share on Facebook or other social media using the tag #lovethyneighbor2018.

The event is FREE and all are welcome!

Arkansas House of Prayer and its sister organization, The Interfaith Center, both based in Little Rock, are honored to hold this gathering, now in its seventh year.

Love Thy Neighbor began as a peace-oriented service on the grounds of the House of Prayer, marking the 10th anniversary of September 11, 2001 as an opportunity to draw people together who are dedicated to peace in our community and the world.

Located in West Little Rock on the campus of St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church, Arkansas House of Prayer is set apart in Nature, dedicated to contemplative prayer, meditation, and quiet, where all are welcome (arkansashouseofprayer.org).

The Interfaith Center is part of the Institute for Theological studies at St. Margaret’s, and its mission is to reduce the hatred and fear among the world religions (interfaith.itssm.org).

Love Thy Neighbor Site

Seeking A Quiet Place Inside

Meditation for Kids and Adults, Sunday April 2, 1:30 – 4:30.

Click the image to visit the Interfaith Center website for more information.

Silence Stories

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House of Prayer users each have their own, unique experiences of visiting the House of Prayer, and their own stories to tell. We’re excited and grateful to share creative professional, father, meditator, and dog-lover Levi Agee’s below!

Levi’s Story

“I am so thankful for the Arkansas House of Prayer. I grew up very spiritual but in college, drifted away as life got busier and my environments and ambitions changed. I soon found out that I was living my life out of balance and after my daughter was born I was suddenly faced with a myriad of anxieties and worries that would manifest themselves into a crippling anxiety disorder. Over time I’ve learned that I was living my life mainly on auto-pilot, working my way through the American Dream or what I thought it was without really facing any of the discomfort or suffering in my life. Through therapy and lots of seeking I came into the practice of meditation.

Taking time out of my day to just sit with what is and not trying to fix anything has been one of the hardest things I’ve ever tried and the most rewarding. I try to practice sitting everyday, but it isn’t always easy. In raising an energetic four-year-old, there aren’t many opportunities for quiet reflection at home except for bedtime, but then I’m usually too tired to meditate. So having a place of quiet and serene beauty minutes from my work gives me the perfect opportunity for some solace in a busy workday as well as being easily incorporated into my daily routine. I can stop by the Arkansas House of Prayer for fifteen minutes before I head in to work or even longer on my lunch break. I was also excited to be able to apply for a key fob to have access to the House of Prayer 24/7 making it a lot easier to find some peace in a hectic schedule or if I’m feeling inspired at any hour of the day or night. I believe that you can find a practice anywhere, but there’s something about the design and purpose of the Arkansas House of Prayer that adds to the experience. The gorgeous architecture and natural surrounding landscape leave me with a feeling of awe every visit.

There’s something about being in a space with a purpose of helping people find peace and quiet that enhances my meditation in a way that being at home or in my car doesn’t do. When I first visited the House, I wanted to evangelize it to everyone, how lucky we are to have a place like this in Central Arkansas. I got some tongue-in-cheek feedback that a friend told me to keep our little secret quiet for fears that it would become overcrowded soon if everyone knew how great it was. I hope sincerely hope it does. I hope people learn of this place and come out in droves so that they have to build new and bigger ones and maybe instead of seeing a bank on every corner we start seeing prayer houses just like the Arkansas House of Prayer.”

Centering Prayer and Meditation

Join Rev. Lowell Grisham (St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Fayetteville, AR) and Dr. Nick Cole (Contemplative Outreach, Ltd.) in this one-day immersion into Centering Prayer, which many practice as a form of meditation and as preparation for contemplative prayer. Both Rev. Grisham and Dr. Cole have years of experience practicing as well as guiding others through this practice of consenting to Divine presence and action within.

Centering Prayer, while having its roots in the contemplative branch of Christianity, is open to persons of all faiths and philosophical backgrounds. We are honored to welcome our facilitators back again for this year’s fall retreat.

Moving From Darkness Into Light

Love Thy Neighbor: Moving From Darkness Into Light, featuring musical performances, speakers from several of the world’s religions, and an Interfaith Food Festival will be held Thursday, September 8 at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 1000 N. Mississippi Avenue in Little Rock, beginning at 6 p.m.

The event is free and open to the public.

The intergenerational service will last about an hour, including speakers, time for prayer and silence, musical performances from local artists, a presentation by the Multifaith Youth Group, and an interfaith chorus. The third annual Interfaith Food Festival will follow the service, with vegetarian dishes prepared by members of the interfaith community.

While no childcare will be provided, children are welcome at this event.

Arkansas House of Prayer and its sister organization, The Interfaith Center, both based in Little Rock, are honored to hold this gathering, now in its fifth year.

Love Thy Neighbor began as a peace-oriented service on the grounds of the House of Prayer, marking the 10th anniversary of September 11, 2011 as an opportunity to draw people together who are dedicated to peace in our community and the world.

The Interfaith Center is part of the Institute for Theological studies at St. Margaret’s, and its mission is to reduce the hatred and fear among the world religions.

Love Thy Neighbor 2015 Video

We are so excited to bring you the video of last September’s interfaith gathering, “Love Thy Neighbor: Meeting at the Well,” where people of many faiths gathered to pray, laugh, listen, sing, and eat together. The event hosted 400+ people and was followed by the 2nd annual Interfaith Food Festival that featured foods of ritual or cultural significance to the people and faiths represented at Love Thy Neighbor.

This special gathering was hosted by St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Little Rock and is co-sponsored by The Interfaith Center and Arkansas House of Prayer. We hope you enjoy the video and make plans to attend next year’s event on Thursday, September 8, 2016. Theme TBA.

SEEKING SILENCE AFTERNOON WORKSHOP

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$35 (Checks payable to Arkansas House of Prayer). For more information, contact the Rev. Cindy Fribourgh.

Sponsored by Arkansas Interfaith Center, a ministry of St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church.

FALL CENTERING PRAYER RETREAT

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 14, 2015

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

You are invited to join the Arkansas House of Prayer community and facilitators Rev. Lowell Grisham and Dr. Nick Cole for a one-day retreat focused on silence, contemplative prayer, and opening up to the presence of the Divine. There will be teaching for beginners as well as persons experienced in Centering Prayer, as well as time all together in the House of Prayer. Participants may register for single sessions (morning or afternoon) for $35 or all-day for $75. A vegetarian lunch will be provided for all-day attendees.

The workshop will be hosted by St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church (AR House of Prayer is located on their campus).

Centering Prayer has its roots in ancient Christian forms of contemplation, but its contemporary approach is open to people of all faiths. All are welcome. For more information, please e-mail the registrar at the address listed in the image above.

LOVE THY NEIGHBOR: MEETING AT THE WELL

Thursday, September 10, 2015

St. Mark’s Episcopal Church

1000 N. Mississippi Ave., Little Rock, AR

Doors open at 5:45

Event starts at 6:00.

Arkansas House of Prayer and The Interfaith Center will present “Love Thy Neighbor: Meeting at the Well,” taking place at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church on Thursday, September 10, 2015, and featuring musical performances, speakers from several of the world’s religions, and an Interfaith Food Festival to follow the event.

Arkansas House of Prayer and its sister organization, The Interfaith Center, both based in Little Rock, are honored to be able to hold this gathering for the 4th year in a row. The event began as a peace-oriented service on the grounds of the House of Prayer, marking the 10th anniversary of September 11, 2011 as an opportunity to draw people together who are dedicated to peace in our community and the world. The event has grown over the years and is moving to a larger location, St. Mark’s Episcopal Church (1000 N. Mississippi Ave.), for the first time this year.

The event is open to the public of all ages and free of charge. The intergenerational service will last about an hour and will feature speakers from the world religions, time for prayer and silence, musical performances from local artists and an interfaith chorus, and, for a second year in a row, an Interfaith Food Festival with vegetarian dishes prepared by members of the interfaith community. While no childcare will be provided, children are welcome at this event.